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news:common_envelope_physics [2015/11/11 11:51]
srepetto created
news:common_envelope_physics [2015/11/11 11:52] (current)
srepetto
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 +**Natasha Ivanova**, University of Alberta, CA. Tuesday November 24th, 4:00pm, room HG 00.062  ​
 +
 +**Common envelope evolution**
 +
 Common-envelope events, during which two stars temporarily orbit within a shared envelope, are believed to be vital for the formation of a wide range of extremely important astrophysical objects, including X-ray binaries, cataclysmic variables, close double-neutron stars, the potential progenitors of Type Ia supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. ​ While the problem is almost 30 years old, its theoretical foundation did not progress much from the first simplified consideration till very recently. ​ For many years, the simple parameterization has been intensively exploited by population synthesis studies, and, with no surprise, showed inconsistency with observations. ​ In recent years, the advances in our understanding of stellar structure, improvements of the numerical techniques for hydrodynamical simulations as well as new observations started to bring improvements in our understanding of physics of the common envelope phase. ​ In this talk I will review the main theoretical uncertainties tha Common-envelope events, during which two stars temporarily orbit within a shared envelope, are believed to be vital for the formation of a wide range of extremely important astrophysical objects, including X-ray binaries, cataclysmic variables, close double-neutron stars, the potential progenitors of Type Ia supernovae and gamma-ray bursts. ​ While the problem is almost 30 years old, its theoretical foundation did not progress much from the first simplified consideration till very recently. ​ For many years, the simple parameterization has been intensively exploited by population synthesis studies, and, with no surprise, showed inconsistency with observations. ​ In recent years, the advances in our understanding of stellar structure, improvements of the numerical techniques for hydrodynamical simulations as well as new observations started to bring improvements in our understanding of physics of the common envelope phase. ​ In this talk I will review the main theoretical uncertainties tha
 t we have when considering the common envelope, the recent progress in our understanding of its physics, the success and failures of hydrodynamical simulations as well as whether we will be ever able to observe common envelope events in situ.  t we have when considering the common envelope, the recent progress in our understanding of its physics, the success and failures of hydrodynamical simulations as well as whether we will be ever able to observe common envelope events in situ.